SPEAKING OF EDUCATION PODCASTS

History in My Backyard and Yours with Guest Richard Williams


In this episode Richard Williams, a retired public school educator, shares his pedagogical approach for bringing history to life through “learning by doing.” As a classroom teacher, a department chair, and a cooperating teacher, Mr. Williams has worked to connect students with the rich history of their own home towns and the surrounding area. Since his retirement, Mr. Williams continues to pursue his passion by doing research, giving presentations, and serving on the board of historical associations.

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Teaching African-American History With Guest Ralph Proctor, Jr., PhD


In this episode, we talk with Ralph Proctor, Jr., PhD, a Professor of Ethnic & Diversity Studies at the Community College of Allegheny County. During our conversation we explore the historical challenges of incorporating information about the role of African-Americans since the founding of America to the present.  In particular, focuses on how such information can be taught in ways that build bridges among those with different social and cultural backgrounds. 

Among the courses that Dr. Proctor teaches are Understanding Violence in American, African-American History, Achieving Cultural Competence, and African Art/Artifacts in the Cycle of Life. Over the years he has served in professional and administrative capacities in academia, social service agencies, and business organizations. He pioneered the use of oral history at the University of Pittsburgh with his study, Racial Discrimination against Black Teachers and Black Professionals in the Pittsburgh Public School System: 1934-1973 (now published by Learning Moments Press). In addition, Learning Moments Press has published Voices from the Firing Line: A Personal Accountof the Pittsburgh Civil Rights Movement and Song of The Hill: Life, Love, Legacy about Pittsburgh’s iconic Black community. In his personal and professional life Dr. Proctor has been and continues to be a tireless warrior in the battle for civil rights. 

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Why I Started and Why I Stay—Remaining Committed to Our Children’s Future with Guest Michelle Cravens


In this episode, we talk with Michelle Cravens who offers her perspective as an educator with many years of experience within different contexts and age levels. At the beginning of the podcast, Cravens shares how an early job at an Animal Shelter had a profound impact on her. At the shelter she cared for animals who had been abandoned and abused.  She learned to nurture them and at times hold them tight as they left the pain of this world behind.  She worked beside Class-D felons who had overwhelming compassion for the animals and an incomparable work ethic. This experience greatly influenced her as she continued to pursue a career in education. She has served as a middle school English/Language Arts teacher, an elementary school counselor, and a Bridge Program teacher in an alternative high school program. Michelle currently is a Middle School Counselor where she works as part of the Instructional Leadership Team in a CSI labeled school with one of the most diverse populations of middle school students in the state of Kentucky.  In her school, 40% of the students are Multiple Language Learners, 56% are considered minority populations, and about 20% qualify for special education.  Close to 80% of the student population fall into a lower socioeconomic status. Michelle is currently completing a Doctorate of Education in Educational Leadership at Northern Kentucky University.  

 

 

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Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate with Guest Jill Alexa Perry, PhD


Dr. Perry is the Executive Director of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate, a consortium of universities committed to the promotion of practice-based scholarly research. During this conversation Dr. Perry recounts the events surrounding the formation of CPED, its mission, its accomplishments, and examples of various practice-based studies.  

Additional information about the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate is available at https://www.cpedinitiative.org 

Dr. Perry’s publications include the books: The Improvement Science Dissertation in Practice; The EdD and the Scholarly Practitioner, and In Their Own Words: A Journey to the Stewardship of the Practice in Education.

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Collaboration with Community Arts Organizations with Guest Wendy Milne, EdD


In this episode we continue our conversation with Dr. Wendy Milne with a focus on her work with two community arts organizations—Attack Theater and the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art (SAMA).  

We explore how this collaboration began and its power for generating excitement and understanding of the arts among students, school personnel, parents, and the general community. As Dr. Milne points out, the lessons they learned about virtual artist residencies and teaching offer new avenues for connecting students with the world of art beyond the school walls.  

Additional information about Attack Theatre is available at https://www.attacktheatre.com. Additional information about SAMA is available at  https://www.sama-art.org

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Reflective Artmaking and Professional Learning with Guest Wendy Milne, EdD


In this episode we talk with Dr. Wendy Milne, an elementary art educator and the 2004 recipient of the outstanding Elementary Art Educator Award from the Pennsylvania Art Education Association. The focus of our conversation is Dr. Milne’s use of reflective artmaking as a mode of professional learning and her school district’s use of differentiated projects to fulfill Pennsylvania’s mandate for teacher evaluation. In recent years, the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate has been advocating for the preparation of scholarly practitioners. The ways in which Dr. Milne has built upon and extending the work of her dissertation is an excellent example of the power of practitioner inquiry. 

Dr. Milne’s award winning dissertation serves as the basis for her book, Professional Learning through Reflective Artmaking: A Pedagogical Portfolio, available on Amazon. Professional Learning Through Reflective Artmaking: A Pedagogical Portfolio

 

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Boundary Setting as Care in the Life of an Early Childhood Educator with Guest Susan Roth


In this episode, Susan Roth shares her concerns about the lack of understanding and recognition given to the field of early childhood education. With a Master’s degree and over 12 years of experience in a variety of pre-K settings, Roth is a thoughtful and impassioned advocate for credentialed professionals who work with children during critical stages of early development. As Roth reflects on her years of teaching, she articulates the challenges of setting boundaries as a form of care for her students and herself. 

 

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The Space Between–A Conversation about Hearing Loss & Identity—Part 2 with Guests Megan Reister, PhD, Jane Ammon, EdD, Stef Gardiner-Walsh, PhD


In this episode, we continue our conversation with Dr. Megan Reister, Dr. Jane Ammon, and Dr. Stef Gardiner-Walsh. As these professors share the focus of their doctoral research, they illuminate the concepts of “other mothering” and “MotherScholars.” Each is committed to preparing future teachers to work effectively with students who have some form of hearing loss.  

Kemmery (Reister), Megan A. Are You Deaf or Hard of Hearing? Which Do You Go By: Perceptions of Students with Hearing Loss. Ph.D. Dissertation (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2014). 

Ammon, Jane. Decentering Whiteness in Teacher Education Through A Creative Self Study of Womanist Caring Pedagogy. Doctoral Dissertation (Kutztown University, 2022).   

https://research.library.kutztown.edu/edddissertations/23 

Gardiner-Walsh, Stef. Factors Characterizing the Academic Experiences of Children with Mild Bilateral or Unilateral Hearing Loss. Doctoral Dissertation (The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 2015). 

Reister, Megan. MotherScholars’ Perceptions , Experiences, and the Impact on Work-Family Balance (Lexington Books, 2022). https://rowman.com/Lexington

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The Space Between–A Conversation about Hearing Loss & Identity—Part 1 with Guests Megan Reister, PhD, Jane Ammon, EdD, Stef Gardiner-Walsh, PhD


This episode features three university professors—Dr. Megan Reister of Franciscan University, Dr. Jane Ammon of Chestnut Hill College, and Dr. Stef Gardiner-Walsh of Illinois State University. These three educators share their experiences of growing up with hearing loss and how these experiences inform their work with students. All three completed dissertations on issues of identity and “being other” in a hearing world.  

Kemmery (Reister), Megan A. Are You Deaf or Hard of Hearing? Which Do You Go By: Perceptions of Students with Hearing Loss. Ph.D. Dissertation (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2014). 

Ammon, Jane. Decentering Whiteness in Teacher Education Through A Creative Self Study of Womanist Caring Pedagogy. Doctoral Dissertation (Kutztown University, 2022).   

https://research.library.kutztown.edu/edddissertations/23 

Gardiner-Walsh, Stef. Factors Characterizing the Academic Experiences of Children with Mild Bilateral or Unilateral Hearing Loss. Doctoral Dissertation (The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 2015). 

Reister, Megan. MotherScholars’ Perceptions , Experiences, and the Impact on Work-Family Balance (Lexington Books, 2022). https://rowman.com/Lexington 

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Nurturing Youth Creativity with Guest James “JB” Brown



This episode features our conversation with James “JB” Brown, musician, producer, educator, and director of Creative Youth Development for the Homewood-Brushton YMCA in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. With a state-of-the-art recording studio and a S.T.E.A.M. maker space, the Y offers elementary, middle, and high school students opportunities for developing their creativity and gaining skills necessary for college and future careers. During the conversation Brown shares the philosophy that underpins the program as well as some of the amazing experiences provided to young participants, including a trip to the Czech Republic so a hip-hop group, Blow Ya Mynd, could perform on the main stage of the YMCA International Youth Festival.
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The Complexities of Teacher Education and the Importance of Teacher Research–Part 2 with Guest Frances Rust, PhD


Today’s guest is Frances Rust, PhD, Professor Emerita at New York University’s Steinhardt School. Dr. Rust has a distinguished career as a teacher educator and has directed programs at Teachers College of Columbia University, Manhattanville College, Hofstra University, and NYU; most recently she has served as Senior Fellow and Director of the Teacher Education Program at the University of Pennsylvania GSE. Among her numerous awards are the 1985 AERA Outstanding Dissertation Award, the 1998 Teachers College – Columbia Outstanding Alumni Award, the 2001 Association of Teacher Educators Distinguished Research Award, and the 2009 National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators Outstanding Teacher Educator Award.  She has published widely on topics related to teacher preparation, teacher professional development, and teacher-driven action research and school improvement. As a Fulbright Fellow, Dr. Rust is currently working with the Council of the International Forum on Teacher Educator Development (InFo-TED). In this conversation, we explore the current state of teacher education, Dr. Rust’s vision for the future of teacher education, and the importance of teacher research. 

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The Complexities of Teacher Education and the Importance of Teacher Research–Part 1with Guest Frances Rust, PhD


Today’s guest is Frances Rust, PhD, Professor Emerita at New York University’s Steinhardt School. Dr. Rust has a distinguished career as a teacher educator and has directed programs at Teachers College of Columbia University, Manhattanville College, Hofstra University, and NYU; most recently she has served as Senior Fellow and Director of the Teacher Education Program at the University of Pennsylvania GSE. Among her numerous awards are the 1985 AERA Outstanding Dissertation Award, the 1998 Teachers College – Columbia Outstanding Alumni Award, the 2001 Association of Teacher Educators Distinguished Research Award, and the 2009 National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators Outstanding Teacher Educator Award.  She has published widely on topics related to teacher preparation, teacher professional development, and teacher-driven action research and school improvement. As a Fulbright Fellow, Dr. Rust is currently working with the Council of the International Forum on Teacher Educator Development (InFo-TED). In this conversation, we explore the current state of teacher education, Dr. Rust’s vision for the future of teacher education, and the importance of teacher research. 

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Creating Culturally Inclusive Environments in the Early Childhood Classroom with Guest Brooke Varghese



This episode features our conversation with Brooke Varghese who has taught in China, Vietnam, Oman, and the United States. Having experienced what it is like to be a stranger in totally different cultures, Varghese is particularly concerned with creating welcoming, inclusive environments for her young students. As Varghese points out, even in the same community, each family has its own culture. One important role of early childhood education is helping students make the transition from the familiarity of their home culture to differences encountered in the broader community. To read a Scholarly Personal Narrative written by Varghese to fulfill a requirement for her Master’s degree visit the scholarpractitionernexus.com.
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Challenges of Securing Supports for Children in the Early Childhood Setting with Guest Alyson Woodall



This episode features our conversation with early childhood educator Alyson Woodall who now directs a diocesan pre-school program created by her mother. For a time, this mother-daughter team worked together, blending “old school” pedagogy with new approaches. She offers a unique perspective as an educator with many years of experience within different contexts and age levels. Woodall shares her concern about students manifesting mental health issues in the early childhood classroom and the challenges of securing various supports and services to support these children. 
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Integrating Project-Based Learning into Secondary Curriculum with Guest Gina Ligouri



This episode features our conversation with Gina Ligouri about project-based learning. Ligouri is a well-respected, trailblazing educator from western Pennsylvania who was named Pennsylvania’s Technology Innovator of the Year in 2020. She has earned degrees from Carlow University, Robert Morris University and Duquesne University where she studied English Literature, Instructional Technology, and Supervision/Curriculum Development, respectively. She currently chairs the English department at Montour High School and participates in her district’s co-curricular, project-based learning courses. In April 2022 she was a featured presenter at the Western Pennsylvania Council of Teachers of English (WPCTE) GET CONNECTED Conference. Her presentation was titled: Project vs. Project-Based Learning.   For a copy of Ligouri’s presentation visit scholarpractitionernexus.com and click on S-P Library-PowerPoints. 
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The Dance of Teaching with Guest Maura Bell



This episode features our conversation with Maura Bell who changed from her career as a professional ballet dancer to education. Teaching in a university laboratory school, Bell infuses her Reggio inspired pedagogy with her understanding of expressive movement. Bell uses dance as a metaphor for illuminating pedagogical principles in the Scholarly Personal Narrative she wrote for completion of her Master’s degree. Those with an interest in early childhood education, the Reggio philosophy, and personal narrative as a genre for practice-embedded inquiry can read “Get to the Point(e): Dancing between the Reggio Philosophy, Culturally Relevant Teaching and Trauma-Informed Care” at scholarpractitionernexus.com
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  1. This piques my interest because I have always loved dancing. It is inspiring for me to see a past ballet dancer teach children. I would like to incorporate dance moves into lesson plans of my own in the future. Thank you so much for sharing.

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Early Childhood Education—Part 2 with Guest Roberta L. Schomburg, PhD



This episode features Dr. Roberta L. Schomburg, an internationally recognized expert in child development and early childhood education. Dr. Schomburg worked with Fred Rogers to develop activities that educators could use in conjunction with the issues raised in Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. She has served as the Executive Director of the Fred Rogers Center and currently is a consultant on projects of Fred Rogers Productions, including Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, Donkey Hodie, and Alma’s Way. For many years, Dr. Schomburg served as Associate dean and director of the Carlow University School of Education. During this conversation we explore the creative ways in which technology can be used to enhance children’s development of skills. 
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Early Childhood Education—Part 1 with Guest Roberta L. Schomburg, PhD



This episode features Dr. Roberta L. Schomburg, an internationally recognized expert in child development and early childhood education. Dr. Schomburg worked with Fred Rogers to develop activities that educators could use in conjunction with the issues raised in Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. She continues to support the development of educational programming for children initially as Executive Director of the Fred Rogers Center and currently as a consultant to Fred Rogers Productions. For many years, Dr. Schomburg served as Associate dean and director of the Carlow University School of Education. During our conversation, Dr. Schomburg shares the events that led to her work with Fred Rogers, the process he used to develop his programs, and the philosophy that inspired his messages to children and their parents. 
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The Value of Arts in Education—Part 2 with Guest Sarah Tambucci, PhD



This episode features Dr. Sarah Tambucci, an experienced artist, educator, and advocate for children and youth.  Dr. Tambucci has served as President of the National Arts Education Association and is currently Director Emerita of the Arts Education Collaborative in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 2005, she received the Pennsylvania Governor’s Award for Outstanding Leadership in Arts Education. In addition to authoring numerous articles on issues related to arts education, educational leadership, and policy, she serves on regional, state and national advisory boards. During this conversation, Dr. Tambucci shares her extensive experience with arts education as a teacher, principal, and mentor of beginning art teachers. In addition, she describes an institute through which she has helped school superintendents to understand the importance of integrating the arts across subject areas and grade levels.
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The Value of Arts in Education—Part 1 with Guest Sarah Tambucci, PhD



This episode features Dr. Sarah Tambucci, an experienced artist, educator, and advocate for children and youth. Dr. Tambucci has served as President of the National Arts Education Association and is currently Director Emerita of the Arts Education Collaborative in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 2005, she received the Pennsylvania Governor’s Award for Outstanding Leadership in Arts Education. In addition to authoring numerous articles on issues related to arts education, educational leadership, and policy, she serves on regional, state and national advisory boards. During this conversation, Dr. Tambucci shares her concerns about the pervasive anger and uncivil behaviors to which children are being exposed. She discusses the role of art in helping children express their concerns and deal with strong emotions. 
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