Podcasts

In our book, On Being a Scholar-Practitioner: Wisdom in Action, we propose six qualities comprising a stance of scholarly practice: pedagogical wisdom, theoretical understanding, contextual literacy, ethical stewardship, metacognitive reflection, and aesthetic imagination. In addition, we suggest that Scholar-Practitioners engage in communities of practice to further their own capacity for scholarly practice; to share the wisdom they have gained through thoughtful study of their practice; and to advocate for quality education. The resources provided in the S-P Library relate to one or more of these ideas. They are not the result of exhaustive reviews. Rather they are materials that have informed our thinking, inspired light bulb moments, or provide portals to other relevant resources.

Diane Ravitch Joins the Klonsky Brothers on Hitting Left

Diane Ravitch, educational historian and activist, joins the Klonsky Brothers on Hitting Left and Mario Smith - host of Lumpen Radio's News From the Service Entrance for an hour talk about schools and her latest book, Slaying Goliath: The Passionate Resistance to Privatization and the Fight to Save America's Public Schools. Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts / Google Podcasts / Stitcher / Spotify / YouTube or your favorite podcast app.

Diane Ravitch The Author of Slaying Goliath on the Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Diane Ravitch has been called a hero in her dedication to preserving public school education. In this episode of The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan, Diane Ravitch joins Mitchell to discuss her latest book, Slaying Goliath: The Passionate Resistance to Privatization and the Fight to Save America’s Public Schools, out now from Knopf. Ravitch talks with Mitchell about the “Disrupters,” who are funding privatization and believe schools should be run like businesses, and the “Resisters,” a powerful group of volunteer parents, teachers, students, bloggers and leaders who are fighting back to successfully keep alive their public schools. Are school voucher programs a viable solution? Ravitch shares her thoughts on this and more.

Recorded at Books & Books in Coral Gables, Florida on January 31, 2020.

Host: Mitchell Kaplan

The Unintended Consequences of Performance-Based Funding

Performance-based funding, which ties a portion of a college’s state support to outcomes like graduation rates and degree production, remains one of the most widely used accountability drivers in higher education. In recent years, however, researchers have found that it can have unintended consequences for underrepresented student groups. One of those researchers, Seton Hall University’s Robert Kelchen, led a national study of colleges and universities to understand the impact of performance-based funding, and whether targeted bonuses can boost enrollment rates for minorities and low-income students. He joins CPRE research specialist Robert Nathenson to discuss his findings and their potential implications for higher education policy across the U.S. Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts / Google Podcasts / Stitcher / Spotify / YouTube or your favorite podcast app. Interviewer: Robert Nathenson, Research Specialist, CPRE Interviewees: Robert Kelchen, Assistant Professor, Department of Education Leadership, Management, and Policy, Seton Hall University

The Role of Race in Special Education Identification

A new, wide-ranging study led by Michigan State University's Todd Elder finds that a student's race can play a significant role in whether or not they are identified with a disability. Elder joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss his study - which analyzed birth and education records for every child born in Florida over a ten-year span - and its potential implications for practitioners, policymakers, and future research. Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts / Google Podcasts / Stitcher / Spotify / YouTube or your favorite podcast app. Interviewer: Keith Heumiller, Managing Editor, CPRE Knowledge Hub Interviewees: Todd Elder, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Michigan State University Department of Economics

Born to Win, Schooled to Lose

From kindergarten to the workforce, disadvantaged students face significantly longer odds than their advantaged counterparts, according to a new report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce (CEW). The report, which found that less talented students from affluent beginnings are more than two times as likely to begin a successful career as even the most talented students from disadvantaged families, paints a stark picture of status, race, and lifelong achievement gaps in the U.S. Georgetown CEW Director Anthony Carnevale joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss the report and its implications for education, federal policy, and the concept of upward mobility. Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts / Google Podcasts / Stitcher / Spotify / YouTube or your favorite podcast app. Interviewer: Robert Nathenson, Research Specialist, CPRE Interviewees: Robert Kelchen, Assistant Professor, Department of Education Leadership, Management, and Policy, Seton Hall University

Free Pre-K: How Cities are Growing and Funding High Quality Programs

From new property taxes to a so-called "soda tax," U.S. cities have found creative ways to fund and grow free, high quality preschool programs. Now families - and researchers - are reporting on the personal and academic benefits of those programs for local children. We welcome Shante` Brown (Director of Operations, PHLpreK), Milagros Nores (Research Co-Director, NIEER) and Phil Sirinides (Senior Research Specialist, CPRE) to discuss two growing programs in Seattle and Philadelphia, and their unique approaches to fostering quality and improving access. Listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts / Google Podcasts / Stitcher / Spotify / YouTube or your favorite podcast app. Interviewer: Philip Sirinides, Senior Research Specialist, CPRE Interviewees: Shante` Brown, Director of Operations, PHLpreK; Milagros Nores, Co-Director of Research, National Institute for Early Education Research

Sir Ken Robinson (still) wants an education revolution

The TED Interview Do schools kill creativity? Back in 2006, Sir Ken Robinson posed this question to the TED audience – and boy, did it touch a nerve. More than fifty million views and a decade later, Chris sits down with Sir Ken to dig into the changes and progress that have been made, and see if the answer now is any different. How are educators thinking about creativity these days? And why should creativity be a focus at all? With his characteristic verve, wit and sparkle, Sir Ken explains all.